expect so much
5 Reasons It’s Time for a 4-Day Work Week

salon:

  1. It makes workers more productive
  2. It’s good for the environment
  3. It makes employees happier
  4. It creates a healthier workforce
  5. It brings America into the 21st century

Read more.

Wal-Mart earned $27 billion in profit last year. They could afford to pay their bottom million workers $10,000 more a year, raise all of those people out of poverty, cost — save taxpayers billions of dollars, and still earn $17 billion in profit, right? It’s simply nuts that we have allowed this to happen. […] You know, this ridiculous idea that a worker on Wall Street who earns tens of millions of dollars a year securitizing imaginary assets or doing high-frequency trading is worth 1,000 times as much as workers who earn tens of thousands of dollars a year educating our children, growing or serving us our food, throwing themselves into harm’s away to protect our life or property, that this difference reflects the true value or intrinsic worth of these jobs is nonsense.
Made me laugh

Made me laugh

historicaltimes:

This is Trench Warfare. Photo taken by an official British Photographer during WWI, c.1917



Amazing photograph

historicaltimes:

This is Trench Warfare. Photo taken by an official British Photographer during WWI, c.1917

Amazing photograph

Here is a compilation of polling data from various reputable American polling organizations, describing the policy preferences of the Americans people over the last year.


Economic Issues:

↳ Americans who think that U.S. wealth should be more evenly distributed: 59%

↳ Support heavy taxes on the rich to redistribute wealth: 52%

↳ Oppose cuts to Social Security or Medicare: 69%

↳ Oppose cuts on programs assisting the poor in order to address the deficit: 59%

↳ Support increasing taxes on the wealthy: 60 - 80%

↳ Support increasing the minimum wage to at least $10.10 an hour: 71%

↳ Support labor unions: 54%

↳ Spend too much on defense: 37%

↳ Extending unemployment benefits by at least three months: 58%



Cultural Issues:

↳ Support marriage equality: 59%

↳ Support keeping abortion legal: 54%

↳ Disagree with SCOTUS striking down Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act: 51%

↳ Support the Paycheck Fairness Act: 62%

↳ Support legalizing marijuana: 58%

↳ Support a pathway to citizenship: 68%

↳ Support universal background checks for all gun purchases: 81%

↳ Support universal background checks and disqualifying offenses for gun purchase: 55.5% of Gun Sellers



Environmental Issues:

↳ Believe in climate change: 73%

↳ Support stronger EPA air regulations: 72%

Did Ridley Scott’s “Exodus” movie give the Sphinx a white/European makeover?

The backlash against Ridley Scott’s Exodus is gathering momentum. After Noah’s mixed reception earlier this year, more and more people are sick of seeing movies with “whitewashed” casts: White actors representing historical figures who almost certainly were not white.

The latest accusation of Exodus whitewashing relates to someone who technically isn’t even a character: the Sphinx.

The likeliest explanation is that the sculpture in this picture is not the Sphinx, but is in fact a statue of Ramses. This means that it would have been based on actor Joel Edgerton’s face. 

Unfortunately, this just makes the whitewashed casting even more blatant, because real statues of Ramses II simply do not look like that. So while Exodus may not have made a “white version” of the Sphinx, Egyptian culture is still being erased and rewritten to fit in with the film’s predominantly white cast of actors.

[READ MORE]

america-wakiewakie:

"How large is America’s prison problem? More than 2.4 million people are behind bars in the United States today, either awaiting trial or serving a sentence. That’s more than the combined population of 15 states, all but three U.S. cities, and the U.S. armed forces. They’re scattered throughout a constellation of 102 federal prisons, 1,719 state prisons, 2,259 juvenile facilities, 3,283 local jails, and many more military, immigration, territorial, and Indian Countryfacilities.”
— The Leader of the Unfree World | The Atlantic 

america-wakiewakie:

"How large is America’s prison problem? More than 2.4 million people are behind bars in the United States today, either awaiting trial or serving a sentence. That’s more than the combined population of 15 states, all but three U.S. cities, and the U.S. armed forces. They’re scattered throughout a constellation of 102 federal prisons, 1,719 state prisons, 2,259 juvenile facilities, 3,283 local jails, and many more military, immigration, territorial, and Indian Countryfacilities.”

— The Leader of the Unfree World | The Atlantic 

nevver:

What are you gonna have? (larger)

Interesting. 

Regarding the highway bill, I think the current tea party obstructionists and others who oppose it are freeloaders. That’s right. Republicans like Eisenhower knew public infrastructure is an investment in the future. For the past few decades we have been enjoying the benefits of that without properly maintaining. That is freeloading on the “Greatest Generation” with little regard for the next generation.

Scott Oakes (via moreleftthannot)

Yes we are living off the capital investment of the 50s and 60s.  Without this investment Reaganomics would have collapsed immediately.  The entire modern Conservative economic concept requires squeezing out all they can without reinvesting and then moving on to somewhere else without looking back.

(via iammyfather)

Most reasonable people would grant that privacy is a function of liberty. And if we get rid of privacy, we’re making ourselves less free. If we want to live in open and liberal societies, we need to have safe spaces where we can experiment with new thoughts, new ideas, and [where] we can discover what it is we really think and what we really believe in without being judged. If we can’t have the privacy of our bedrooms, if we can’t have the privacy of our notes on our computer, if we can’t have the privacy of our electronic diaries, we can’t have privacy at all.
Edward Snowden (via azspot)
The reason sickness is undesirable is not that it causes distress or discomfort but that it results in what is often called “lost productivity”. This is a sinister and absurd notion, predicated on the greedy fallacy of counting chickens before they have hatched. “Workplace absence through sickness was reported to cost British business £32bn a year,” the researcher claimed in Metro: a normal way of phrasing things today, but one with curious implications. The idea seems to be that business already has that money even though it hasn’t earned it yet and employees who fail to maintain “productivity” as a result of sickness or other reasons are, in effect, stealing this as yet entirely notional sum from their employers.

Steven Poole: Why the cult of hard work is counter-productive (via toffeemilkshake)

In the US there are companies that take sick days and personal time off from the same pool of days. I had fifteen total in a year, and that’s regarded as pretty generous. Of course, if I actually did have anything that didn’t physically stop me getting in to work, I’d do so - it’s better for me to sit at my desk unproductive (and possibly infecting co-workers) than lose a holiday day.

Well done for reverse incentives there, free market capitalism.

(via blech)